Gifted & 2e Right Brained Learners

Discovering Your Child is Gifted – Does It Matter?

Discovering Your Child is Gifted – Does it matter 2

Post may contain affiliate links to materials I recommend. Read my full disclosure statement.

Venturing into writing about having a gifted child is a whole new area for me. I wrote recently about discovering Caroline’s giftedness. In part, I wrote:

As evidenced by the topics in my header, I’ve always known that Caroline had unique traits. But I never really researched the gifted angle seriously because… I don’t know. I just didn’t. Even though I’m gifted and qualify for Mensa so it would make sense she would be gifted, I just didn’t zero in on this with her. Maybe God’s restraining hand? However, after digging into the reading I have zero doubts. Some of the characteristics made me laugh out loud because it’s just SO OUR LIFE! There was one list in particular that zeroed in on some very. specific. things. that just astonished me how accurately they described Caroline.

I’m not going to say much about this here since I try to protect Caroline’s privacy online. But a gifted child is not the same thing as having a smart child. Gifted is different and it brings with it a whole set of challenges and opportunities. Like most gifted kids, Caroline’s development is asynchronous in some significant ways and so I’m struggling to determine the best ways to meet her needs and address areas that need focus. And have all of us stay sane in the process.

 

So what made me decide to write about giftedness? Well, I’m writing about it today because it is time for the Gifted Homeschool Bloggers monthly blog hop and I’m using this event to force me out of my comfort zone and write about it.

Giftedness: Why does it matter?

The theme this month is Giftedness: Why does it matter? I put off writing this post day after day because I feel so inadequate to the task. I feel like I’m just starting to figure out what this means for us and, frankly, it’s overwhelming. I feel ill-equipped to give any kind of insight on this topic. It’s hard to even draw on my own experiences because Caroline and I are gifted differenly in some significant ways. I was also a K-12 public school child so my frame of reference for what it means to be gifted in an educational setting is completely different from our homeschooling situation. (As in, we had professional specialists working with us. In Caroline’s situation, I’m the specialist.)

But I do know one reason why it matters. Identifying Caroline’s giftedness (and, in the process, revisiting my own) matters because it shows me I am not alone on this journey. Discovering other parents who wrestle with the same issues and questions is important both for Caroline and for me as her mother and teacher. A child’s giftedness changes your life. It means adjusting your expectations. It also means experiencing some amazing joys.

Those of you who have followed my blog for many years know that I wrote very little about life with Caroline after I had her. I had a very public long-awaited pregnancy, but then it just changed. I didn’t write because I didn’t know what to write. I didn’t want to write something I would regret later on. Our early years were not blissful days of a perfectly photographed baby, but rather parenting a high need baby. The first four years were HARD. And so I just kept my blogging mouth shut for the most part.

Caroline will be eight in a few weeks and I just now feel like I have enough experience under my belt and distance from the early days that I can write with some sense of clarity. David and I can see the fruits of our labors to this point. Discovering Caroline was gifted brought all of it together somehow.

Why Identifying a Child’s Giftedness Matters for the Parents

So is it important to know your child is gifted? Yes, I think it is. Obviously it is important for the child. Gifted children often feel that they don’t fit in and understanding you are wired differently can make a big difference in knowing who you are and the unique ways you are blessed.

But it’s also really important for the parents. It’s important to know that your child is different in a good way. She does demand more out of you. Her asynchronous development is normal. And there are plenty of families like yours out there.

The first four years I felt very alone. I felt like almost no one could relate to our struggles. It was very lonely. I learned to keep my mouth shut in real life because to discuss our challenges almost always brought judgement and condemnation, even from people who probably meant well. Our confidence as parents took a terrible hit during those years. I don’t want other people to experience that and if my writing can help just a few families through those tough times, then it was all worth it.GIftedness why does it matter blog hop

Do you know which six words bring a smile to my face quicker than almost anything? “I’m so glad I found you.” Of all the comments I receive on here, that is the one that makes me smile and glow inside every. single. time. Because I know someone else doesn’t feel alone any longer. And it makes my heart sing to know that is true.

Identifying giftedness matters. Identifying spiritedness matters. Identifying high sensitivity matters. Identifying right-brainedness matters. Identifying twice-exceptional really matters.

It matters because it gives us hope and confidence as parents to move forward and love our kids in the way they uniquely need.

Gifted Parenting Resources

The Survival Guide for Parents of Gifted Kids: How to Understand, Live With, and Stick Up for Your Gifted ChildThe Survival Guide for Parents of Gifted Kids: How to Understand, Live With, and Stick Up for Your Gifted ChildThe Drama of the Gifted Child: The Search for the True Self, Revised EditionThe Drama of the Gifted Child: The Search for the True Self, Revised EditionTwice-Exceptional Gifted Children: Understanding, Teaching, and Counseling Gifted StudentsTwice-Exceptional Gifted Children: Understanding, Teaching, and Counseling Gifted StudentsEmotional Intensity in Gifted Students: Helping Kids Cope with Explosive FeelingsEmotional Intensity in Gifted Students: Helping Kids Cope with Explosive FeelingsParenting Gifted Kids: Tips for Raising Happy and Successful Gifted ChildrenParenting Gifted Kids: Tips for Raising Happy and Successful Gifted ChildrenThe Survival Guide for Gifted Kids: For Ages 10 and UnderThe Survival Guide for Gifted Kids: For Ages 10 and UnderRaising a Gifted Child: A Parenting Success HandbookRaising a Gifted Child: A Parenting Success HandbookParenting Gifted Children 101: An Introduction to Gifted Kids and Their NeedsParenting Gifted Children 101: An Introduction to Gifted Kids and Their NeedsLiving With Intensity: Understanding the Sensitivity, Excitability, and the Emotional Development of Gifted Children, Adolescents, and AdultsLiving With Intensity: Understanding the Sensitivity, Excitability, and the Emotional Development of Gifted Children, Adolescents, and AdultsHelping Gifted Children Soar: A Practical Guide for Parents and TeachersHelping Gifted Children Soar: A Practical Guide for Parents and TeachersA Parent's Guide to Gifted Teens: Living with Intense and Creative AdolescentsA Parent’s Guide to Gifted Teens: Living with Intense and Creative Adolescents

&

Discovering Your Child is Gifted – Does it matter

9 Comments

Click here to post a comment

 

  • I love that: “I’m so glad I found you.” I’m so glad I found a community in GHF! Who knew I’d bond with people over a blog post? 😉

    In the same way, I also tell people in my community who teach my son “I’m so glad I found you” because they get it and they understand him.

    So glad you can blog about your daughter now. 😉

  • Parenting gifted children can be a hard and lonely path. Finding others with similar stories is a real blessing! No wonder “I’m so glad I found you” brings a big smile to your face!

  • Thank you for saying the first 4 years were hard. They were for me, too, and for a long time it seemed awful to say so (not anymore! 🙂 )

  • I’m so glad I found you 🙂 I am. I feel like I’m just emerging into the world now, almost 6.5 years into this journey. I, too, felt “off” for those first years. I felt I was failing in some ways, as he didn’t do anything that The Books said he would. Nothing seemed to work. And then, we had him tested and the game changed. Thank you for this.

  • Ditto what Cristy wrote. Every time I meet someone who understands it is such a relief to know I am not alone. I have met most of those people since we started homeschooling when my oldest child was 4, and am blessed to have those friends, local and online.
    Like you, I find it hard to write anything important on my blog (hence no link) as everything is so personal, and the learning curve is so steep I rarely feel ready to share it. Thanks for sharing part of your story. 🙂

  • I’m glad I found you and the other parents from GHF! 🙂 At least now, I don’t feel so alone in dealing, learning and struggling to understand giftedness and how to handle it in our family.

    I recognize that the gifted are a small part of the population and that it’s really hard to find other gifted people who live in the same area that we do. I’m thankful that with the advances in technology, we can connect with other gifted individuals and their parents all over the globe.

  • Hi,

    I am writing from Bangalore, India. My three and a half year old boy seems to be gifted. I have been researching on the topic in the internet and he seems to show most of the signs mentioned there. However, a trip to a child psychiatrist and a lousy IQ test tells me that he has ADHD which I feel is not true. Is it something which is common? Are gifted children often diagnosed wrongly? Are there any reliable resources on the internet whic can help me identify if my son os truly gifted or not?

Welcome!

Sallie-Schaaf-Borrink-060313-B-250x250I'm Sallie, teacher by training and now homeschooling mom of Caroline. My passion is to provide products, encouragement, and information that helps others discover and do what works with their children. I also write about living a cozy life as a highly introverted person. Welcome! ♥

Your Cart

100 Wholesome Books for Girls and Tweens

Categories

Scroll Up
109 Shares
Share4
Pin104
+1
Tweet
Stumble
Email